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An Interview with Anne Beach: Christian Education at the Parish and the Diocesan Level

Anne served as church school director of St. Paul Antiochian Orthodox Church (Brier, WA) from the fall of 2005 through May of 2019. She is also the Diocesan Coordinator for the Diocese of Los Angeles and the West, serving the Pacific Northwest area. In this role, Anne schedules, organizes, and provides educator workshops as requested, and advises and trains Church School personnel. Additionally, Anne recruits the Creative Festivals Chair for the Northwest.

How many students attended your church school for the 2018-2019 school year? How is your church school organized for Sunday classes and how many teachers are assigned per class?

We had 29 students attend our church school program this year. Our classes are divided by school grade, differences occur from year to year - some are single grade, some are two grades depending on the number of students. This past year we had 3’s & 4’s combined, kinder, no 1st grade students, 2nd grade, 3rd grade, 4th grade, 5th & 6th grade, no 7th grade students, one 8th grade student who joined the 9th/10th grade class, and 11th/12th grade class. Classes have patron saints; several years ago, we decided to take our class patrons from the lists of North American saints. We have at least one teacher per class. We have had teachers with assistants, co-teachers, and teachers who alternated Sundays. We try to be flexible based on our student numbers, their needs, and teacher preferences.

Upcoming Teacher Development Workshops: Sept. 21 and Sept. 27-28

Interested in hosting a teacher training for your parish? Please contact Leslie Atherholt at aodce.events@gmail.com​ or 717-747-5221.​

St. George Antiochian Orthodox Church, West St. Paul, MN, will welcome Christian Education Director Carole Buleza to conduct a teacher development workshop this fall. Please join us on Saturday, September 21, 2019.

Courses for the day include "Overview of Orthodoxy," during which we'll review the foundational doctrines of our Faith and interactive ways of teaching our children as they grow. "New Methods in Teaching" will have us discussing lesson planning, productive classroom environments and brain-based learning. Our final course, "Moral Issues," will allow us to explore topics our older youth face and the Orthodox perspective on each.

To register for this event, contact Christina Worrall at worrall.christina@gmail.com or 571-334-2306.

Registration
Schedule
Flyer
Course Descriptions​

Antiochian Women of the East Fall Retreat & Gathering at Holy Protection Monastery

We are pleased to announce the first AWE Fall Retreat & Gathering on October 12, 2019 at Holy Protection Monastery in White Haven, PA. We listened and heard you about having a Fall Retreat and Gathering that is near you while being accessible to many across both Dioceses.

Come meet your sisters in Christ from other parishes to spend the day with one another meditating in the beauty and silence of the Monastery with worship, fellowship, and a spiritual discussion with Fr. Don Shadid as Keynote Speaker. His topic is "Resisting Temptation in the Modern World."

Holy Protection Monastery is on a mountain overlooking the Lehigh River Valley in the Pocono Mountains region of Pennsylvania, with a white cross that can be seen on the Monastery's mountain from Interstate Route 80.

August 2019 Newsletter

Dear friend of St. Athanasius Academy:

Author of Resurrection and Life – Jesus:  On the road to Bethany, John 10:39-40

Not unto the death of Lazarus, but unto the glory of Jesus – John 11:4

John 11: 39: "Take away the stone." Martha, said to Jesus, "Lord, by now He is giving off an odor. He has been dead four days." 40 Jesus said, "Did I not tell you that if you believed, you would see the glory of God."

1. Why did Jesus not summon Lazarus from the grave from a distance or raise him before the stone was removed? In His guidance, it is good for people to see beyond miracles in hopes to grasp a deeper appreciation of His glory and grace. This is possible only by active participation – for such is the path of knowing Jesus to be our Father, from in the beginning.

(Read more in our August newsletter.)

August 2019 Coupon (PDF)

On Creating (and Using) a "Godfulness Jar" in Your Classroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mindfulness is a buzzword in current culture. One of Merriam-Webster’s definitions for mindfulness is this: “the practice of maintaining a nonjudgmental state of heightened or complete awareness of one's thoughts, emotions, or experiences on a moment-to-moment basis.” Many mindfulness practices encourage focusing your mind on positive thoughts. Unfortunately, the thoughts being promoted are not necessarily compatible with our Orthodox Christian faith. 

Some of our students are already experiencing mindfulness training in their school. Some teachers are finding it to be a helpful tool in their classroom. (In fact, it was one teacher’s suggestion of keeping a jar of quotes on hand to help students focus that inspired the idea for the “Godfulness Jar”.) 

While affirming our own selves is not what we’re about as Orthodox Christians, the practice of focusing our minds should not be a foreign concept to us. We hear often in the Divine Liturgy a reminder to focus: “Let us attend!” It depends upon what we focus that causes that focus to be for our growth or our downfall.

On the Mother of God: Quotes from the Church Fathers

As we prepare our hearts for and then commemorate the Feast of the Dormition of the Holy Mother of God, let us take some time to think about Mary, the Theotokos. What can we learn from her love for God and her submission to His will? How did her choices and the way that she lived her earthly life affect ours? How does she continue to impact the world since her Dormition?

We have gathered quotes from the Church fathers about the Theotokos. Many of those quoted here lived in an age closer to her earthly life than the current era. We plan to share these quotes for you to ponder throughout the (new calendar) fast. As you read each quote, may you be inspired to be as genuine, humble, and obedient as she has been. 

May the Holy Mother of God pray for all of us, that we will be saved and that we will follow God as wholeheartedly as she did!

July 28 is St. Timon Sunday

His Grace Bishop Basil writes:

In a gesture of Christian love and support for Metropolitan SABA and his flock, the Diocese of Wichita and Mid-America has committed itself to a Sister Diocese relationship with the venerable Archdiocese of Bosra, and many of our parishes and missions have come forward to be paired - or "twinned" - with congregations in Metropolitan SABA's Archdiocese in Sister Parish relationships. To call attention to this project, dubbed "The Hauran Connection," the Sunday nearest July 28th, the feast of St Timon, is observed annually as "St Timon Sunday" throughout our Diocese.

This year our annual "St Timon Sunday" will be Sunday, July 28th. On that day we ask our congregations to highlight all aspects of our Sister Diocese project.

Read His Grace's full letter.

Interview with Matthew Duncan: the goal is to be engaged with each other

Antiochian Orthodox Department of Christian Education
Interview Series: Church School Directors throughout the Archdiocese
Matthew Duncan, St. Mary Antiochian Orthodox Church, Pawtucket, RI

July 2019

The Goal Is To Be Engaged with Each Other


How long have you served as Church School Director?

This is my first year as Sunday School Director at St. Mary. Before that I taught our teen Sunday School class and was the SOYO adviser.

How many students attend your church school? How is your church school organized for Sunday classes and how many teachers are assigned per class?

We have about 50 students on our rolls (but we don’t get that many on a weekly basis). Currently, our Sunday School is made up of four classes: preschool-kindergarten, 1st-3rd grade, 4th/5th grade, and middle school/high school. Each class has one teacher, except the middle school/high school class, which has two teachers. We also have a music teacher who teaches our students Liturgical music every other week. Our teachers—Jiana Dayekh, Nancy Muller, Holly Lazieh, Elijah Vollendorf, Andrea Vollendorf, and Maureen Gurghigian—are all extremely hardworking and dedicated. We’re very lucky to have them in our Sunday School.

July 2019 Newsletter

Dear friend of St. Athanasius Academy:

Gospel Writer John – The Son of Thunder:  Beloved Disciple of Jesus—our Christ and Our Father

He is a pillar of churches, possessing the keys to the House of Wisdom; to Paradise re-opened this day. His Gospel drums the chalice of Jesus being the promised One revealed to Moses – I AM, the I AM. He it is, who in loving trust, reclined his head on the bosom of Jesus – the Incarnate Word – with the trusting of love of a son.

He had no claim to fame, nor social status – a lowly fisherman able only to mend nets. He was untaught, could not read, and was uneducated in the words and ways of the Temple, and its conflicting teaching.

(Read more in our July newsletter.)

July 2019 Coupon (PDF)

Arise, Take up Thy Bed and Walk

Our Ministry to Those with Special Needs

by Bishop THOMAS (Joseph), Peter Schweitzer and Subdeacon David Hyatt

Disabilities which cause cases of special need do not discriminate between races, socioeconomic status, nationality, gender or age. In the United States, people with disabilities are the largest minority group comprising nearly 20% of the population. According to the World Health Organizationi, there are more than 54 million Americans with a physical, sensory, or mental disability of any kind. Across our world, the estimates are that nearly 15% of the human population is affected in some way by a disability that causes special needs in order to function in society, reflecting an increase from 10% in 1970. If these numbers are correct, it is a statistical certainty that our God-protected Patriarchate has a similar number of faithful who desire to pray, learn and serve within our parishes. The needs are among us and surround us in the societies in which we live, the only question is whether or not we will respond in loving action to provide improved accessibility to our inquirers, catechumens and faithful with special needs.

Any Orthodox Christian discussion of those with disabilities or special needs requires an understanding of suffering. In the growing secular societies that surround us, human suffering, disabilities, illnesses, and special needs are tragedies to be overcome and remedied in this life. Otherwise, human life is rendered meaningless and absurd. This is how the contemporary world views suffering and disability. If suffering can’t be overcome, disabilities banished, psychological problems medicated, the human enterprise is considered pointless. Of course, this is not the Orthodox understanding of human life or its purpose.

Bishop Anthony Travels to Pilgrimage Sites in Europe

By Vicky Michaels

In May 2019, His Grace Bishop Anthony travelled to Rome, Italy, where his goddaughter and niece is currently studying abroad. We went to see where she has been studying and to visit the home of His Grace’s grandmother in Montenegro. We landed in Rome and met Antiochian priest Fr. Michael Nasser, who was there picking up his daughter Maria who was studying in Florence. Father took us to the site of St. Paul's imprisonment and martyrdom. We were able to see St. Paul’s prison cell as well as Tre Fontane where he was beheaded. When St. Paul's head was removed, it bounced three times and in that location, a fountain came up out of the ground. 

While in Rome we also visited St. Paul's Basilica, St. Peter's Basilica, the Vatican, the Sistine Chapel, and the Coliseum – all wonderful places to see!

From there we flew to Dubrovnik and drove to Montenegro. We were surrounded by mountains with the sea in the middle. Bishop Anthony was able to serve in the church of his grandmother, St. Nicholas in Kotor. How wonderful it was to see the old church and beautiful ancient town! The church even honored us with a reception after the liturgy.

2019 Pentecost Greeting From Bishop Anthony

June 16, 2019
Great Feast of the Descent of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost

Beloved Clergy and Laity of the Diocese of Toledo and the Midwest:

Glory to Jesus Christ! Again and again we are refreshed with the awareness that we have seen the True Light and have received the Heavenly Spirit. On Pentecost, we once again begin our daily and liturgical prayers by saying: "O Heavenly King, the Comforter, the Spirit of Truth, Who art everywhere present and fillest all things..."

​At the Lord's Ascension, he told His disciples, "you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be witnesses to Me in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth." Our Lord's instruction to "Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit" has not been withdrawn. Indeed, the coming of the Holy Spirit is the indwelling power of God to the end that we might fulfill this commission. As I have said before, the victory of Christ given to every man objectively must be accepted by each man subjectively. I must want what I have! I make His victory over death my own by living the virtues of Christ personally. The work of the Holy Spirit is to shape us in virtue so we attain life and we desire this not only for ourselves and our own families, but for every man and woman and child with whom we live and work.

On Pentecost and Missions

We often remember Pentecost as being the day of the descent of the Holy Spirit. We remember the tongues of fire and wonder what that experience would have been like. Perhaps we also limit the important events of that day to the room in which the Apostles were waiting as Christ had commanded them to do when he ascended into heaven. We may not think about the rest of that day, or what happened beyond the room.

Pentecost is considered to be the birthday of the Church. After all, it was on this day that the Holy Spirit descended upon the Apostles. That, in itself, was an event worth celebrating, but it did not just happen for the Apostles' edification. When He descended upon the Apostles, the Holy Spirit enabled them to fulfill Christ's command to go into all the world and preach the Gospel. We don't always ponder that connection when we celebrate Pentecost.

Find Our Coordinators At Your PLC!!

The Department of Christian Education will have a representative at each PLC this summer. If you are interested in speaking with one of our Coordinators or Associates, please let us know. Do you need training for your teachers? Have questions about curriculum or current issues? Our staff is available for trainings and workshops at your Parish. Speak to our staff at a PLC or look for their contact information under Staff and Volunteers on our website.

Here's where you'll find us:

DOWAMA – Dn. Elisha Long will hold a workshop entitled "Lessons From the Front Lines – exploring the dynamics of the current generation of youth" – on Friday, June 21 from 9:30 – 10:45 a.m. Don't miss this discussion! Also, Vasiliki Oldziey will be staffing our information table at various times and speaking to different groups throughout the conference. Stop by to discuss your needs, ask questions or just find out what the AODCE is up to!

Acts of Mercy booklet

A new booklet, "Acts of Mercy," is available for Antiochian Women chapters in North America. Please follow these instructions for printing the booklet prior to distribution. (Download the booklet)

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PRINTING THIS BOOKLET:

When you choose "print" from the file menu, and the printer dialogue box appears, make sure that you check the box that says to print "Actual size."
Do NOT choose: "Fit" or "Shrink oversized pages" or "Custom scale."
Printing "actual size" insures that the graphics on the interior pages match up from one page to another.

If your printer has the capablitiy of printing on both sides of the paper (auto duplex mode), make sure that you check the box: "Flip on short edge."

If your desktop printer cannot print on both sides of the paper, then follow the directions on the printer's pop-up dialogue box for "manual duplex mode" that shows you how to re-insert the paper by flipping it on the "short side."

Greeting From Bishop THOMAS for The Ascension of the Lord and Pentecost

Ascension and Pentecost, 2019
(PDF of Ascension and Pentecost Greeting)

Beloved in Christ,

The twin feasts of the Ascension of the Lord and Pentecost are truly a summation of the entire Christian life. In the Ascension, we are reminded that this life on earth is not our final destiny. Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ ascended 40 days after His resurrection to prepare a place for us with His Father. That is our ultimate destination and should be the object of our thoughts, words, and deeds on a daily basis.

Pentecost or Trinity Sunday reminds us of what our daily lives should be like. Holy Apostle Peter's words to the multitude on that first Pentecost provide us with the key to the Christian life. Peter boldly proclaims "Repent, and let every one of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit." (Acts 2:38-39)

June 2019 Newsletter

Dear friend of St. Athanasius Academy:

Pathway to Paradise: He Who is Light and Life, the one Temple Resurrected 

From this month's Academy Booklet, Part II, we read helpful guidance from St. Athanasius:

The Cross and Reconciliation, Ascension and Pentecost

St. Athanasius writes:
Even on the Cross, He did not hide Himself from sight; rather He made all creation witness to the presence of its Maker. Then, having once let it be seen that "it" (his mortal flesh) was truly dead, He did not allow that Temple – which was Jesus and His Body – to stay there long, but raised it on the third day, impassible and incorruptible – the pledge and token of His victory.

(Read more in our June newsletter.)

June 2019 Coupon (PDF)

Summer 2019 Issue of DIAKONIA Available Online

The Summer 2019 issue of DIAKONIA, the newsletter of the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Women of North America, is now available online. This issue features the Diocese of Worcester and New England, and includes a message from His Grace Bishop John. Sayidna says, "The project for this year is the Antiochian Village. The Antiochian Women have been asked to help add to the buildings of this, our learning and spiritual center, new buildings and a cathedral to meet the growing needs of the Archdiocese. I am pleased with this project and believe the women of the Archdiocese are up for this task.

"I have been blessed by the Antiochian Village for the last 40 years. The Village has given me opportunities to learn, share, make friends, and encounter God. The Village has been for me the primary place of beauty, solitude, prayer and learning. At our Village I have met fellow God-fearing people from all over the Antiochian Church in America and abroad, Orthodox of other jurisdictions and Christians from many backgrounds. Each encounter has enriched my life and taught me about God, myself, and others."

Diocesan Spiritual Advisor Fr. Edward Hughes writes, "You [Antiochian Women], being so very busy in this very busy day and age, take time away from your families in order to minister to Jesus in His Church. You spend yourselves freely and unselfishly, working and 'striving' (as the Antiochian Women’s prayer puts it). May God strengthen you as you serve Him with your whole being."

And the Two Shall Become One Flesh: The Sacrament of Holy Matrimony

By Bishop THOMAS (Joseph), Fr. Joseph Hazar, and Sdn. David Hyatt

"Have you not read," Jesus said, "that He who made them at the beginning 'made them male and female,' and said, 'For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh'? So then, they are no longer two but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let not man separate." (Matthew 19:4-6)

Marriage is a mystery, a sacrament, a uniting of one man and one woman into a living icon of the Holy Trinity, a manifestation of the love of Christ for His Church and the Church for her Lord, the foundation for the family and the generative force for bearing children, and it is the context for working out the salvation of both husband and wife through self-sacrificing love.

In the secular society in which we live, however, marriage has become a contract between two consenting adults based on the fulfillment of each other's needs. The desire "to live happily ever after" has become the fanciful basis for marriage, and also the great downfall of so many romantic beginnings. This self-orientation, of meeting my needs, is evident even in how many go about planning their wedding ceremonies. Many little girls dream of having a fairytale wedding – whatever that may look like in their mind. Some dream of getting married in a cathedral, dressed like a princess, others perhaps on a beach surrounded by only a few of their family and friends, and some opt to want no one there, but to simply elope with the man of their dreams. No matter what their version of the fairytale looks like, the wedding is "their special day."

Gleanings from a Book: Spyridon's Shoes by Christine Rogers

Christine Rogers’ new book, Spyridon’s Shoes is a comfortable fit for its readers. The language is simple enough for mid-elementary-level readers to read on their own. The story line is intriguing, though, and will capture the attention of younger or older children as well as the adults who read this book.

Young Spyros’ family is hard-working, but nonetheless they experience one hardship after another. The book tells the story of how Spyros (a nickname for Spyridon) and his family face each of their struggles with faith. It also reveals the ways in which God chooses to send help.

The grandfatherly man who arrives and helps Spyros when he badly cuts his foot early in the story is, interestingly enough, also named Spyridon. Spyros offers to call the grandfather “Abba” and the man accepts that nickname. After the first meeting, Abba continues to show up in Spyros’ life, helping him as needed and inspiring him to do what is right. It takes the reader almost the entirety of the book to realize that “Abba” is actually Saint Spyridon himself, appearing to and physically assisting his young namesake who truly needs his help.

Registration Opens for Summer Sacred Music Institute, July 10-14

SPECIAL UPDATE: We have just learned that His Eminence, Metropolitan JOSEPH will be with us for the Sacred Music Institute. We are so honored by his wish to attend, and we want to extend registration a little longer since many people will undoubtedly want to see him! Please encourage your fellow chanters, choir members and choir directors to change their plans to include a trip to Antiochian Village in a couple of weeks. We have a wonderful agenda planned that now includes our Father in Christ and Chief Shepherd! (Read the welcome letter from His Eminence)
 
The new registration deadline is Sunday, June 30. On July 1, registration will close permanently. If you have any questions, please contact Emily Lowe, the SMI Coordinator, at sacredmusicinstitute@gmail.com.

REGISTER NOW

SMI RESOURCES

Course Descriptions
Agenda
Biographies
Welcome letter from His Eminence

The Department of Sacred Music is thrilled to announce the summer Sacred Music Institute of 2019, "Sacraments and Song," at the Antiochian Village in Ligonier, Pennsylvania. Sessions will begin on the evening of July 10, 2019 and end with Hierarchical Divine Liturgy on July 14.

This theme offers us the exciting opportunity to learn and practice music for many of the different sacraments offered by our church, including weddings, baptisms, ordinations and Holy Unction. Of course we will also offer our usual sessions on Byzantine chant, conducting, vocal technique and music theory, as well as plenty of time for worship, reflection and building relationships.

A Team Approach to Sunday School Leadership

An Interview with Wafa Omeish and the Church School Leadership Team
St. George Antiochian Orthodox Cathedral, Coral Gables, FL

The Saint George Sunday Church School has an interesting leadership structure. There is a principal, vice principal, and a team of officers and coordinators. The official role and responsibilities of the Principal are defined as, “In charge of curriculum development and implementation. Maintaining a standard of student behavior designed to command respect and minimize classroom interruptions. Orienting/training staff.  Planning and conducting faculty meetings as necessary; planning and implementing Recognition Sunday Program.”

A brief description of the additional positions are as follows:

Vice Principal - Support and assist Principal in all areas.

Secretary - Take minutes of meetings, keep all Sunday School records, maintain files at Church office.

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